Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

User Profile

Collapse

Profile Sidebar

Collapse
Scott Clifford
Scott Clifford
Admin
Last Activity: 06-18-2017, 06:45 AM
Joined: 03-17-2017
Location:
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
  • Source
Clear All
new posts

  • The mysterious Google Barges were floating showrooms for cutting-edge technology

    The Google Barges are four abandoned floating projects built in 2010 and abandoned by 2013. Very luxurious in their glassy appearance and clearly symbolic in their name, they were supposed to be a floating show space and serve as "an interactive space where people can learn about new technology." They were also arks that would preserve and serve technology, and make...
    See more | Go to post

  • Archaeology of the future in the abandoned Sicilian town Gibellina: "The Great Crack"

    We've written before about many small Italian towns and villages destroyed by earthquakes and abandoned soon after. The fate of these places is mostly similar; all of them were left to deteriorate while new settlements were built in their vicinity but away from the rocks and hills and into the valleys nearby where earthquakes could not do as much damage. The sto...
    See more | Go to post

  • Siegfried Line: An abandoned defence wall that saw both peace and war

    The first Siegfried Line (Siegfriedstellung) was built during the World War One, in 1916-17, as a defense line to protect Germany's western front in northern France. It formed a section of a network of tank defenses and forts called the Hindenburg Line. In World War Two, Germany once again erected a line of defense along her western flank. The German's referred to this as the Westwall, but the English nicknamed it the Siegfried Line and this was the name th...
    See more | Go to post

  • Haytor Granite Tramway and its unique granite railway tracks

    Dartmoor National Park in the south of England has its fair share of remnants of old buildings and mysterious stone circles. Perhaps one of the most interesting abandoned structures can be found along the Templer Way footpath, which follows the route of a very unique tramway. Unique because these tramlines are made out of granite. As the industrial revolution in Britain accelerated into the 19th century, so too did the demand for materials to create increasingly ambitious buildings. Plans for t...
    See more | Go to post

  • Flannan Isles Lighthouse: The unsolved mystery of the three missing keepers

    Close to the tallest point on Eilean Mòr, part of the Outer Hebrides Flannan Isles, Scotland, there stands the Flannan Isles Lighthouse. The story about this place contains the usual kinds of details, with its own date of construction and its unique design and location, except for one thing. Inside the dark interior of this lighthouse, there is a 117-year-old mystery: what happened to its keepers? Close to 2...
    See more | Go to post

  • Ruzhany Palace in Belarus was known as the "Versailles of the East"

    Palaces are symbols of wealth, royalty, prestige, and luxury. Every opulent corner and detail in their exterior and interior are often worth a fortune. The builders of the palaces wanted to demonstrate their wealth and the power of their kingdom or empire through the splendor of their palaces. No expense was spared in delivering this message to the world or in competing with other aristocrats to build the most impressive residence. ...
    See more | Go to post

  • The ruins of Villers Abbey in Belgium: At its peak it looked like a small town

    Some ruins around the world are so majestic, picturesque and strangely blend with the environment that they seem like they didn't come out of a glorious past, but more from an unknown future. Such ruins vividly tell us not only about the past, but also how the future could look if man lives in harmony with nature and respects the ruins from the past. Villers Abbey is one of those positive examples. The ruins, located in the Commune ...
    See more | Go to post

  • Underwater ghost village in Portugal, Vilarinho da Furna

    This village roots go as far back as we count time. It was founded sometime in the 1st century of our era by the Visigoths, while the Romans were expanding the nearby road Via Nova XVIII. That's what the oral history tells us at least. The story goes that seven friends built a settlement on the grounds of the present day village....
    See more | Go to post

  • Scott Clifford
    started a topic Ailsa Craig - a granite gemstone for sale

    Ailsa Craig - a granite gemstone for sale

    Judging by the name alone one might get the wrong impression that this story is about a lady named Ailsa. When it comes to the nameitself is a popular choice in Scotland. But the truth is that this tale is about an island 240 acres in size that stands some 10 miles of the coast of Scotland, in the Firth of Clyde. An island filled with blue hone granite which was used in the making of curling stones. Among the earliest recorded mentions about this island was by Sir Donald Monro in th...
    See more | Go to post

  • Semipalatinsk Test Site: "The Polygon" for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapon tests

    Known as "The Polygon," the Semipalatinsk Test Site is where the Soviet Union performed their nuclear tests. The location is in the grasslands of northern Kazakhstan, which was at the time known as the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic. It begins with Lavrentiy Pavlovich Beria, a Soviet politician and national-security consultant who chose the location in 1947 and set the operation in motion. The reason why Beria decided to go with this location was that he claimed tha...
    See more | Go to post

  • Sutyagin House: the world's tallest wooden house was built by a Russian gangster

    In the city of Arkhangelsk in Russia, an icy northwestern port, there was an unusual building thought to be the tallest wooden house in the world. The port where Nikolai Petrovich Sutyagin, the builder of the house, was born and raised was mostly home to fishermen. Sutyagin was a Russian businessman who was infamous for earning most of his fortune through crime. He ...
    See more | Go to post

  • Grain Tower - A massive concrete guardian of Britain

    It was built during the middle of the 19th century, east of the Isle of Grain (despite the name, this place is no longer an island but a marshland) on the coast English county of Kent. The reason that justified its existence is a simple one. It was built because the dockyards such as those found in Sheerness and Chatham were too vital to be lost. This gun tower was here as protection in a case of a naval attack by the French during the ...
    See more | Go to post

  • Scott Clifford
    started a topic Bass Rock - Home to 150,000 Northern gannets

    Bass Rock - Home to 150,000 Northern gannets

    Know as The Bass Rock, or by its simplified sobriquet the Bass, this island is located in an area known as the Firth of Forth (or as Myrkvifiörd as authors of the Norse sagas referred to it) and around 3 miles to the east of the town North Berwick in Scotland. Being a victim of the vicissitude of faith, this island today remains ensnared in its solitude. Throughout the years though some made a home out of it, such as early Christian monks who w...
    See more | Go to post

  • The Isle of May and its story spanning two millennia

    It stands at around 8 kilometers off the coast of Scotland in the waters of the North Sea. This island is no more than 2 kilometers long and less than a kilometer wide, but its history could easily fill a hundred-page book. The name "Isle of May" might have its roots in the Old Norse language that roughly translates to "the island of seagulls," referring to the thousands of seagulls that nest there. Another possible or...
    See more | Go to post

  • Old Idaho State Penitentiary -A birth of a prison

    The history of the American "Wild West" is filled with all sorts of misdeeds and misdemeanors, ranging from horse theft, all the way to forgery, and of course the famous robberies. Back in the 19th century, the wealth that the gold mines produced attracted not only miners, but also outlaws, who were out to "get-rich-quick". To live outside of the grasp of the authorities was what the outlaws yearned for. It is said that back in the 1860s, barely one-quarter of the population in Idaho Ci...
    See more | Go to post

  • Keighley - Royal Arcade and the lost underground shopping street

    In the town of Keighley, there stands a royal arcade offering all sorts of pleasures for its visitors. But this journey through time is about what lies beneath its surface, about a secret accidentally forgotten. It was during the restoration of this royal arcade in West Yorkshire, England, when the secret once more resurfaced. What the workers found in the basement of this arcade was a whole street equipped with Edwardian style shops, forming a unique time capsule. Part of the underground shop. ...
    See more | Go to post

  • Scott Clifford
    started a topic PS Ryde - The voyager and war hero

    PS Ryde - The voyager and war hero

    No more than a pile of rusting steel tucked away in a marina lies an old steamer named PS Ryde. The sister of PS Sandown she was used for the first time by the Southern Railway in 1936. The price for this elegance reached almost £50,000, but being a brainchild of William Denny and Brothers justifies the cost. This renowned Scottish shipbuilding company dates back as far as the 19th century, when William Denny started its business. PS Ryde as she looked in 1969. Author: Johnrag...
    See more | Go to post

  • Manchester Mayfield railway station - The filming location of Prime Suspect and The Last Train

    Public transportation such as the railway is always an important part of the lives of millions of people across the globe. It is a critical vein in the city's "bloodstream" diligently offering its services 24/7. And when one such vein gets cut off, the city inevitably gets sick, but gets better eventually, for time heals all wounds. One such instance is the Manchester Mayfield railway station. Manchester Mayfield Station. Author: Pit-yacker CC BY-SA 2.5 It once stood south of Fairfield Street in close p...
    See more | Go to post

  • Mamie S. Barrett: her undecided fate and well-known story

    Her name is Mamie S. Barrett, and her story began almost a hundred years ago in a place known as Howard Brothers' shipyard. Her birthplace was in Jeffersonville, Indiana and the cost of building this structure almost reached $145,000 (equivalent to $2 million in modern money). The Howard Brothers' shipyard was founded in 1834 by James Howard. They operated for a full century, for they were among if not the most influential shipbuilders of their age. Throughout their caree...
    See more | Go to post

  • Cane Hill Asylum: One of England’s most iconic sites for urban explorers was demolished in 2008

    The Cane Hill Asylum in Surrey County, England, was built as a necessity because the other psychiatric hospitals in the area were filled to capacity. Before the 19th century, there were no institutions for the pauper lunatics and only a few private hospitals existed which were unable to provide the care that was needed. In 1841 the Springfield Asylum was opened ...
    See more | Go to post
No activity results to display
Show More
Working...
X